Performance Enhancing Drugs

That’s the title I gave this humorous image when I posted it on Imzy. And yes, I appreciate it as a joke. But it got me thinking…

Most of you will recognize this as a take on the classic Serenity Prayer written by Reinhold Niebuhr around 1934:

God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change,
Courage to change the things I can,
And wisdom to know the difference.

This meme substitutes coffee for courage, wine for serenity,  and removes wisdom completely. I can’t shake the feeling that that’s a metaphor for our culture.

Feel a bit drowsy, drink coffee. Want an extra edge, try an energy drink. Having trouble sleeping, try Ambien. Feeling edgy, have a drink. Feeling lonely, try Häagen-Dazs. Feeling bored, distract yourself with some mindless entertainment. Feeling anxious, surf the Web for hours to allow yourself the false feeling of accomplishing something. Artificial solutions that mask symptoms without solving problems.

It seems to me that people are spending a lot of time, energy, and money seeking external quick fixes for things that are really resolved only by internal changes. No amount of chemical additives will change our bodies’ natural need for the right amount of quality rest. Numbing our minds doesn’t solve anything, it only delays it—which often makes it worse. Triggering the pleasure receptors in our brain with our drug of choice (I’m partial to Goobers) is just as ineffective as numbing our minds.

Courage is not necessarily the absence of fear. It may be doing the right thing despite your fear. It may be realizing that you can’t “fail” because the results are ultimately up to a Higher Power. Courage is built by the character that comes from consistently doing the right thing, no matter the consequences. It is strengthened by the knowledge that God never asks you to “succeed,” he only asks you to obey.

Serenity can be mimicked for a short period of time, but true serenity can never be produced by external means—yes, even if they legalize cannabis. It’s a state of inner peace that transcends outer stimuli. It is cultivated by prayer and meditation. It is strengthened by developing a spiritual, eternal viewpoint that doesn’t expect worldly institutions to resolve spiritual problems.

Wisdom isn’t the same as knowledge. Knowledge can be abstract, wisdom is applied. Wisdom helps us discern what is too petty to worry about. Wisdom helps us see underlying causes rather than visible problems. Wisdom helps us see the difference between “making our point” and helping resolve a situation. Wisdom sees the difference between arguing small nuances of one biblical verse and living the Bible’s big messages.

Don’t misunderstand me; I’m not saying you shouldn’t enjoy a cup of coffee or a glass of wine. But we should be on guard to prevent external things from distracting us from taking on the true, prolonged inner battles.

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Love isn’t convenient

You’ve probably heard the old cliché that love is a verb. It’s true.

Those great old romantic movies that portray love as a feeling are touching, but they’re based on an emotion that can be fleeting. True love is a commitment, and those are not fleeting. It’s a commitment to act in certain ways that display that love. A couple of things have happened in the past week that illustrated that.

Last Saturday was the Walk to End Alzheimer’s in Berea. I led a team in fundraising in support of my mother. I received a donation from someone we had helped through a rough time a few years ago, and the donation was very much appreciated. But then he asked for the address of the walk, because he wanted to come down to be there in person. This man, his wife, and their beautiful little girl, drove an hour and a half each way to come from Campbellsville and walk with us in support of my mother. They’d never met her, but he loved me and wanted to show it.

Yesterday my wife had a fall and broke her ankle. Today, friends drove down from Lexington to deliver a dinner for us tonight. They didn’t come to our home, because they didn’t want her to feel like she had to “be ready for guests.” They met me at work and dropped off food, a bottle of wine, and a rose, tea, and chocolates for Tiffani.

I’ve come to believe that love is most visible when it’s not convenient. It’s the things we do going out of our way that speak love most clearly. Jesus frequently praised people who went out of their way, such as the Good Samaritan, those who visit prisoners, and those who care for people in need. He said true love is laying down your life for someone else.

I thank God for showing love for me in the most inconvenient way imaginable; the sacrifice of his Son. I thank God for bringing people into my life who demonstrate love. I pray that He will continue to develop me into a more and more loving person to others.