The Power of Truth

The Power of Truth
or
What is Your Church’s Attraction Model?

Today I was stricken by the fact that in my rush to get to Jesus I often skim over John the baptizer. The Gospel of Mark totally overlooks Jesus miraculous birth, and yet Mark takes time to talk about John the baptizer. This makes sense, since the coming of John was actually predicted by the prophets talking about the coming Messiah! Even his birth and family were special, but today my thoughts center around John’s ministry.

What did people see when they looked at John? Matthew and Mark both tell us that his clothing was a robe of coarse camel hair and a leather belt. The prosperous people of the time would have been wearing linen robes, and cloth belts with tassels. Less prosperous people would have been wearing wool with rope belts–often with tassels. Wearing a camel hair robe (or mantle) would indicate poverty. It gave an impression like bibbed overalls; someone who wears things that will last a long time because the person has a hard time and can’t afford to replace them frequently. He was not a preacher in a shiny suit, starched shirt, silk tie, and shined shoes. Nothing about his appearance gave the impression that following his teaching would make life easier or more prosperous.

What did people hear when they listened to John the Baptist? I can’t find a single place where he tried to entertain people. He didn’t encourage them, he exhorted them. In Matthew 3 and Luke 3, John is reported as giving a perfect example of the “turn or burn” message we often make fun of–including directly referring to being burned in fire. He gave the people instructions like, “If you have two shirts, give one to the poor. If you have food, share it with those who are hungry.” “Be content with your pay.”

Can you imagine a spiritual leader today telling people to be content with their pay? Especially coming from someone who looks like they don’t get any pay? From someone who eats grasshoppers?

This was a time when the people were under Roman rule. They had been conquered. They were subject to a foreign government that levied high taxes on them, and gave them new laws that they had never agreed to. But John didn’t tell them:

“You can’t help it, you’re just oppressed.”
“It’s the government’s fault.”
“You deserve better.”
“It’s the fault of the {insert people group}.”

No, what John told them is that they needed to change. Themselves. Us.

And yet the people left their towns and went out to the middle of nowhere to see and hear John’s teaching. By the thousands! And repented, and were baptized. Are you and your church having that kind of impact?

In 1 Corinthians 9, Paul tells us that it is perfectly appropriate to tailor our approach to our culture. Each of us must decide the best way to do that. But we must never lose sight of the fact that our message is not based on our appearance, our entertainment, or our ability to make people feel better about their lives. Our message is based on confronting people with truth. Truth in love, absolutely, but not truth smothered by any other consideration.

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